Iraq Post #7

Human trafficking is somewhat starting to be seen as a human rights problem by the world now, whereas before this issue was put on the back-burner in terms of human rights violations. Human trafficking is not subject to certain countries or certain economies, trafficking happens anywhere and relatively everywhere, even in the United States of America. Countries like Thailand, Armenia, Ghana, China, and many more. Human trafficking is used as a source of income for some countries, which is why even though it is on Tier 3 of the Trafficking in Persons Report conducted by the U.S. government, they see no problem in human trafficking and are making no deliberate efforts to change. There is also no question that it is prominent in the Middle East, being used as a war tactic. Iraq being one of the headquarters for ISIS, there is bound to be human trafficking. According to the BBC, ‘more than 3,000 Yazidi women and children, a minority group of Iraq, have been captured by ISIS militants and are being trafficked for sex.’ There is talk of being raped, tortured, and starved.human trafficking
Human trafficking is not only used as a weapon of war, but also by gangs that take advantage of the absence of human trafficking laws in Iraq. Most of the crimes committed by these gangs are human organ trafficking, female sex trafficking, and child slavery. These gangs exploit and take advantage of foreigners, who come over with no jobs. Stated by an Al-Monitor article, Iraq a hotbed for human trafficking,” There is no public awareness in this regard in the country. Moreover, she pointed out that the victims of human trafficking also become victims of other laws applied against them, and that the law treats them as criminals, not victims.” “Human trafficking operations are not carried out randomly, but in a very organized manner by gangs that are involved in these operations at all levels — including begging, prostitution and organ trafficking. Children are being kidnapped and forced to beg, while young girls are being forced into prostitution in private homes. They all live under dire conditions that resemble slavery.”

The article, Born Free addresses human trafficking goals in their Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for 2016. There is mention of The Outcome Document that has proposed many goals that it hopes to achieve, including: Achieve gender quality and empower all women and girls, promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all, and promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. This document not only wants to end sex trafficking for women and girls, but wants to end child slavery, wants to create equal, sustainable economic growth. Ways of achieving these listed goals would be to get donor support and to measure the rates throughout the years to see if change is happening. Countries that have a lot of money always brush off human trafficking issues, but with this document, they are forced to talk about these issues that they generally avoid at all costs. Achieving this massive goal takes tiny steps, Carlson and Hilton, for example, have been first movers in their industry, training staff to recognize trafficked victims. And nonprofits such as Airline Ambassadors International have partnered with U.S. airlines for the same purpose: to educate personnel to recognize human trafficking. With more money and focus, such efforts could be scaled up. Results will come relatively slow seeing how human trafficking has not really been the top priority on most countries’ lists.

References:

http://www.state.gov/j/tip/rls/tiprpt/2015/243366.htm

http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2014/01/iraq-human-trafficking-absence-law.html

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-29339696

 

 

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